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SPSA News

Prostate Cancer News: Below you will find news articles in chronological order (latest at the top). You will find interesting news, events, stories, latest testing and research, activities and much more.

Apr
15th
2020

Subject: Prostate Cancer cases diagnosed too late

Category: PC News

Prostate cancer is set to become the UK's most common form of cancer within a decade, amid warnings that more than half of cases are being diagnosed late, a major report warns. The research shows deaths from the disease have reached a record high - with more than 12,000 cases a year, up almost a fifth in a decade The new analysis shows that just 47 per cent of cases are being spotted at an early stage, when it is far less deadly. Despite medical advances in the field, and Government pledges to speed up diagnosis, that figure has remained stubbornly unchanged since 2012. Experts warned that without major breakthroughs, the disease is set to replace breast cancer as the most common form of cancer being diagnosed in the UK.

Source: PC News

Apr
15th
2020

Subject: Revolutionary drug for prostate cancer

Category: Hot News

The Times told us that "Precision pill olaparib could help thousands of men with prostate cancer," and the Mail announced, "Hope for thousands of prostate cancer sufferers as trial finds a precision drug can help incurable patients live almost four months longer." Funded by the Prostate Research Centre, Dr Harveer Dev is developing a radical new tool to address why some men with prostate cancer respond to DNA damaging drugs like olaparib and some don’t. Using prostate cancer cells donated by patients, Harveer will create ProCASP, which will be used in the lab to sharpen our understanding of a whole set of drugs which target DNA repair pathways inside a cancer cell, and help doctors identify which therapy will work best for which patient in the clinic. - ProCASP will be used to change DNA in prostate cancer cells. Then, the researchers can see which genetic changes help these drugs kill cancer, and which changes stop them from working. This research will help us find patterns in DNA that can be used to identify patients who will benefit from treatments like olaparib and even radiation which works by attacking cancer DNA.

Source: Prostate Cancer Research Centre

Apr
15th
2020

Subject: none

Category: Prostate Cancer News

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Source: none